Gail Mahoney - RE/MAX Professional Associates



Posted by Gail Mahoney on 1/28/2020

Decorating your home as an adult can be a taxing task. Transitioning from a college student to a professional can take some time. Once you buy your first home, you may find that your tastes for decorating need an upgrade. Those old posters and funny magnets have got to go along with your more sophisticated lifestyle. The decor in your home should make you feel comfortable in your surroundings. You should express your own personal interests through the artwork thatís displayed in your home. 

Pieces of artwork shouldnít just be run-of-the-mill. You need something that will let your personality shine through. You can collect unique pieces in your travels, use personal photographs that you have taken, or simply find things that have meaning for you.


It can be sort of intimidating to dive into a more mature way of decorating but, it can be very rewarding. Youíll also learn a lot about your own style and yourself. Through this self-discovery, youíll find artwork that you can continue to grow with in your home. Below, youíll find some tips for choosing the right artwork for your home. 


Set A Budget


Buying artwork can be an investment. If youíre a new homeowner, you may need to hold back on getting expensive art for a few years. Set a limit for how much art you want to buy and what you can afford. There are plenty of ways to get decorating pieces for your home for less money. Many stores offer artwork that can add some character to your walls. Even if these arenít Picasso originals, they can certainly add some flair to the emptiness of a new house. Everything that adds personality to your home isnít hanging on a wall either. Your decor includes the small figures on your tables, statues, plants, and more.  


Have Goals In Mind


If you begin hanging artwork without some reason, your decorating scheme could end up being a disaster. Map out a plan for each room. Think of themes, colors palettes, and the vision for the space. You donít want to make a serious investment in artwork only to find out that it doesnít fit with your wall color or furniture. When choosing artwork, itís important to consider each room as a whole. 


Know That Tastes Change Over Time 


If you do invest in an expensive piece of artwork, know that it may not suit your needs forever. Thatís OK! You can always sell artwork and find replacement pieces over time. Itís not expected that whatever you hang in your home when you move in will stay there for the next 20 years! Artwork very much flows with our lives, so go with the flow.              





Tags: decorating   first home  
Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by Gail Mahoney on 1/21/2020

Image by JayMantri from Pixabay

Reality TV shows captured the entrepreneurial imaginations of everyday people that anyone with cash and determination can turn a profit remodeling blighted homes. While profitable home-flipping tends to be more difficult than celebrities make it seem, one niche group appears to have a secret recipe for success — Flipsters.

The term “Flipster” is a conflation of “home flipper” and “Hipster.” What has escaped the casual eye of those outside the Hipster community is they are not merely artsy young people embracing the latest counter-culture. In fact, Hipsters tend to have a strong entrepreneurial nature that plays out within the bounds of their neighborhoods. Flipsters are an extension of that spirit who focus on turning a profit flipping homes in these neighborhoods. Of course, this begs the question: How are Flipsters different, and are they good for your property values?

How Flipsters Differ From Home-Flippers

The Flipster recipe for success involves going after downtrodden properties. If you recall a Hipster neighborhood a decade before their arrival, it was probably in decline and rife with crime. Unlike the stars on TV that seek that one bad penny in a jewel neighborhood, Hipsters are all about gentrification. They are inclined to buy depressed single and multifamily properties and renovate.

The initial wave of Hipsters most likely plan on setting down roots among their brethren. Soon after, Flipsters come in to scoop outlying homes knowing Hipster sprawl may be imminent. In this sense, Flipsters work in the opposite direction as traditional home flippers.

But their sense of security comes from being cultural insiders and a willingness to rent or wait for cash-flush community members to buy the property. That may sound like a simple enough way to flip homes for onlookers. However, the Hipster community tends to be tight-knit, and the homes must adhere to a loose ideology.

What You Should Know About Flipster Homes

If you watch Reality TV home-flipping shows, then it’s apparent that trendy, shiny, and new are game-changers. For the Flipster, old and re-purposed are the tricks of the interior design trade. Shopping for items at Good Will, junk stores, or the city landfill are more likely to yield the materials necessary to create a neat interior or exterior.

Smart technology, quirky gadgets, and artsy vintage stuff are also signatures of a retro Hipster living space. If you’re considering mapping out the Flipster method and replicating it, think again. Insiders tend to shy away from non-Hipsters, which could leave you holding on to a property too long and taking a loss.

Are Flipsters Good For Property Values?

The short answer is: That depends. If you own a property in a depressed area that Hipsters have begun to gentrify, chances are you can move it. The Catch 22 is that you would probably need to be an insider to get top dollar. However, it may be in your best interest to hire well-known Flipsters to renovate the property in keeping with the expanding scene. Making a deal could earn you increased resale value or at least a very cool space of your own.




Tags: Flipping   Property   Investment  
Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by Gail Mahoney on 1/14/2020


We know that location matters when youíre trying to find the right home to buy, but why?  First, buying a home you like in a location that matches your needs is a sign of a solid, long-term investment. Finding the right home isnít always the answer to your property search woes. Many times, finding a house that needs a little TLC in the right neighborhood can give you a better return on your investment than finding a move-in ready house in the wrong neighborhood. You want to think in terms of finding a home that will be easy to sell if you so choose to sell it. Most importantly, you want to feel comfortable in your home and in your surroundings. What are the signs of a good location? Below, youíll find the most important things you should look for when searching for a home. 


Safe Neighborhood


Everyone wants a safe neighborhood, and you certainly know a sketchy neighborhood when you drive through it, but what denotes a neighborhood as ďsafeĒ? First, if you see people up and walking around a place, you know itís a good start to finding a safe neighborhood. People who are outside, interacting with one another give a neighborhood a community feel. You will feel like your neighbors have your back in a neighborhood like this. 


Quality Schools


the better the school district is, the higher the property values in the area are. If you donít have kids, this may not be much of an issue for you. However, if youíre thinking that you may want to sell your home anytime in the future, keep in mind that a less than reputable school district can really dip into property values. 


You Can Easily Access The Things You Need


If you can access the shops, restaurants, and other conveniences easily from your neighborhood, thatís the sign of a good location. No one wants to have to drive 45 minutes in order to get to the grocery store. Many people who are looking for homes like to be in or very close to the action and have easy access to the things they need. Think in terms of convenience when it comes to location. 


A View And Nature


A home with a view is always a sign of a great location. whether youíre near the water or near the mountains, itís nice to have something scenic and peaceful near your home to enjoy. Property values near the water are also always a bit higher than those further inland.


Transportation    


Access to public transportation is key in many neighborhoods. You want to be able to easily get to and from where you need to go without waiting around. If the area is more suburban or rural, access to freeways and main roads is key. Adding precious time to your commutes is never pleasant. Many times location and commute times come down to a simple matter of balance and planning when searching for a property.        





Posted by Gail Mahoney on 1/7/2020

If you recently bought or sold or home, it may be only a matter of time before you need to move into a new residence.

The stress of getting ready for moving day can be overwhelming, particularly for those who have lots of items to pack but only a limited amount of time to do so.

Lucky for you, we're here to ensure you can enjoy a seamless moving day.

Now, let's take a look at three tips to help you prepare for moving day.

1. Begin Packing Up Your Belongings ASAP

Start packing today, and you'll be able to get your belongings ready for moving day. /p>

Categorizing your moving boxes usually is a great idea. For example, placing kitchen items together may make it easier for you to unpack all of your kitchen belongings at once when you arrive at your new address.

Don't forget to declutter while you pack as well. If you find there are items that you no longer need, you may be able to sell them or donate them to charity before moving day arrives.

In addition, if you need a moving truck to transport your belongings from one location to the next, you should make reservations as soon as you can. The longer you wait to book a moving truck, the less likely it becomes that one will be available for your upcoming move.

2. Cancel Your TV, Internet and Phone Services

As moving day approaches, it can be easy to forget to cancel various services at your present home. However, if you contact your TV, internet and phone services providers today, you won't have to worry about canceling these services on moving day.

In many instances, you may be able to transfer your TV, internet and phone services to your new address. Your services providers will be able to provide full details about all of your options so you can plan accordingly.

Reach out to your utilities providers and other services providers to inform them about your upcoming move too. You also should fill out a change of address form with the United States Postal Service to ensure your mail goes to your new address after moving day.

3. Conduct a Final Walk-Through of Your Current Residence

Before you leave your current location, be sure to complete a final walk-through of your residence. This will allow you to locate any missing items and bring them with you to your new address.

Getting ready for moving day often requires hard work and patience. And if you need extra assistance along the way, your real estate agent may be able to lend a helping hand.

Your real estate agent is a housing market expert who understands exactly what it takes to buy or sell a residence. He or she is happy to provide support at each stage of the homebuying or home selling cycle and ensure you can quickly and effortlessly move from one home to another.

Take advantage of the aforementioned tips, and you should have no trouble prepping for moving day.





Posted by Gail Mahoney on 12/31/2019

Photo by Gerd Altmann via Pixabay

Once you sign a purchase agreement, whether you are the buyer or seller, it is very difficult to back out of it. However, as a buyer, you are able to back out if your real estate agent drafts the contract properly. Real estate agents use a standard contract. That does not mean that you have to accept the contract as it is written. You, as a buyer or seller, may make amendments to the contract. If you do make amendments, don’t get so crazy that the other party will file it in the round file.

Exceptions

Almost every real estate contract you see will have exceptions. In most cases, the buyer or seller has to add the exceptions. An exception is a condition that the buyer or seller has to meet. If the buyer or seller cannot meet that condition, the contract gets canceled and the buyer gets their earnest money back. Some examples of exceptions include:

  • Pending the buyer’s ability to obtain financing;

  • Pending a termite inspection;

  • Pending a home inspection; or

  • Pending clear title.

These are the most common exceptions, though buyers and sellers are not limited to only these. As for home inspections, buyers and sellers often negotiate repairs. If the repairs are significant, the buyer may ask the seller to grant a credit or to make the repair to keep the contract. If the seller refuses and the home inspection is listed as an exception, the buyer may back out and get their earnest money back.

Natural Disasters and Accidents

If Mother Nature rips down the house with a tornado or does extensive damage with a hurricane, the buyer may choose to back out of the contract without forfeiting their earnest money. If a fire burns the house down, whether it’s a forest fire or arson, the buyer may back out, as long as the buyer had no hand in the arson crime.

Other reasons a buyer may back out without forfeiting their earnest money include:

  • Flooding;

  • Extensive damage by trespassers;

  • If the buyer finds that the house is full of mold;

  • If the buyer finds that the seller did not disclose that the house had lead paint or asbestos.

Some contracts are written so that the buyer cannot back out because the seller did not disclose lead paint or asbestos. It is up to the buyer to ensure the clause in the contract is written so that they may back out of the contract. In fact, if asbestos or lead paint is a major concern for the buyer and the house is older, they may want to add that as an exception.

Always read real estate contracts carefully, including disclosures made by the seller. Amend the contract with exceptions if you are concerned about anything that may devalue the property.




Tags: home seller   Contract   Homebuyer  
Categories: Uncategorized